Hackaday | The Pocket Emulator That Will Fit In Your Pocket

If there's one thing tiny Linux Systems on a Chip are good for, it's emulation. There's nothing like pulling out an emulation console on the bus for a quick game of old-school NES Tetris, or beating the next level in Super Mario World. This is the smallest emulation console ever. It'll fit in your pocket, and it has a bright, vibrant screen. It doesn't get better than this.

This project is an improvement on two projects, both of which are some of the top projects on hackaday.io, the best place on the Internet for hacks and builds. The Keymu is (or was, at the time) the smallest emulation console ever, built as a miniaturized version of the Game Boy Advance SP in a 3D printed case and powered by the Intel Edison. The Edison doesn't exist anymore, so after that development moved over to the Funkey Zero, a tiny console built around the AllWinner V3s chip and a 240×240 display. Both of these are tiny, tiny consoles, but as silicon gets better there's always better options, so it's back to the drawing board.

The design of the Funkey Project is again built on the AllWinner V3S SoC with 64MB of DDR2 DRAM. There's a 1.5″ display with 240×240 resolution, and of course this retro emulation console retains the classic and very useful clamshell form factor of the famous Game Boy Advance SP.

Already, this project is in the works and it's shaping up to be one of the most popular projects on hackaday.io ever. Everyone wants an emulation console, and this is the smallest and tiniest one yet. Whether or not this project can carry through to production is another matter entirely, but we're eager to find out.



via http://bit.ly/2GqoD5k
Hackaday | The Pocket Emulator That Will Fit In Your Pocket Hackaday | The Pocket Emulator That Will Fit In Your Pocket Reviewed by Unknown on April 17, 2019 Rating: 5

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